Revisiting C.S. Lewis’ Thesis About the Destruction of Humanity| National Catholic Register

Acclaimed Irish author C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) is known for his clarity. Whether he’s writing fiction (The Chronicles of Narnia, his “space trilogy”) or non-fiction (Mere Christianity, The Problem of Pain, his numerous essays on disparate subjects), Lewis’ imaginative imagery and turn of phrase deliver complicated theology and philosophy to lay readers in language we can understand.  Nevertheless, The Abolition of Man, his 1943 book of philosophical anthropology, has the deserved reputation of being difficult, especially for today’s readers who may be unfamiliar with the many literary and cultural allusions it contains.

Revisiting C.S. Lewis’ Thesis About the Destruction of Humanity| National Catholic Register

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