More Unmarked Graves Discovered in Canada as Church Vandalism Continues| National Catholic Register

The discovery of 182 additional undocumented graves outside a former residential school in Canada has heightened calls to boycott Canada Day, the nation’s independence day celebrated on July 1.  The most recent discovery was achieved through the use of ground-penetrating radar outside St. Eugene’s school near Cranbrook, British Columbia. The local Indigenous nation, the Lower Kootenay Band, has said it is too early to say if the graves, which were originally marked with wooden crosses, belonged to former students of the school. A reckoning over Canada’s residential schools began this spring when at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia the remains of 215 Indigenous children were discovered on the weekend of May 22 with ground-penetrating radar. It remains unclear when or how the children died. Bishop Gregory Bittman of Nelson, which includes the former St. Eugene’s school, has not yet commented specifically on Wednesday’s discovery, but issued a statement upon the discovery in Kamloops.  “Our faith teaches us the importance of respecting and honoring all those who have gone before us,” Bishop Bittman wrote May 31. “Please pray for the repose of the souls of these children, for comfort and consolation for those who mourn their loss, and for spiritual healing and peace in the hearts of all those affected.” The residential school system was set up by the Canadian federal government, beginning in the 1870s, as a means of forcibly assimilating Indigenous children and stripping them of familial and cultural ties.  The Catholic Church or Catholics oversaw more than two-thirds of the schools. The last remaining federally run residential school closed in 1996.

More Unmarked Graves Discovered in Canada as Church Vandalism Continues| National Catholic Register

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