The Long Defeat: Christendom and Its Defenders, 1789 to the Present. Part 3: The Eagle Has Two Heads – Catholicism.org

As we saw in our last instalment, the House of Habsburg carried on the traditions of the Holy Roman Empire into the 20th century, via the relatively new political construction called Austria-Hungary. Shepherded through the last half of the 19th century into World War I by Franz Josef, its last Emperor-King was Bl. Emperor Karl, whose equally devout Empress-Queen is now likewise a Servant of God. After the holy Sovereign’s untimely death, his indefatigable consort guided her eight children through the horrors of the early 20th century. Her eldest, the Archduke Otto, as we saw, gradually changed his efforts from restoring the Monarchy – broken into ethnic bits as it had been – to uniting Europe. The fall of the Soviet Union allowed, with his help, the entrance of most of the Eastern bloc nations – including his former realms of Hungary, Czechia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Croatia – into the EU. But it also allowed the revival of Monarchist sentiment, which had never died out in Austria, and its adjoining Habsburg fragments of South Tyrol and Trieste (Italian since 1918). Certainly the institutional imprint of the Habsburgs remains throughout their former lands, in both Church and State. Despite the secularising tendencies of past decades, there remain functioning chapels in various government offices. Tourists and locals alike flock to see Habsburg residences such as the Vienna and Innsbruck Hofburgs, Schoenbrunn, Eckartsau, Laxenburg, Brandys, Artstetten, the Ischl Kaiservilla, Prague Castle, Konopiste, Buda Castle, Godollo, Bratislava Castle, and so on. Government offices throughout the former Empire are often inherited from the Monarchy – and very often bear their builders’ marks. In the Hungarian Parliament, the revived Crown Guard protect St. Stephen’s Holy Crown, last worn by Bl. Karl. The armies of Austria, Hungary, Czechia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and even to some degree Poland retain many Habsburg-era traditions – this is particularly true among presidential Guard units. Cultural and educational institutions founded under the dynasty also rejoice in their origins. Even in countries such as Poland, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, and Montenegro, there is a major difference in political attitudes and voting patterns between the areas that were part of Austria-Hungary and those that were not, that sociologists have dubbed “the Habsburg Effect.”

The Long Defeat: Christendom and Its Defenders, 1789 to the Present. Part 3: The Eagle Has Two Heads – Catholicism.org

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