Mexico’s bishops see complications from court’s marijuana decision – Detroit Catholic: Read Catholic News & Stories

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Mexico’s bishops have expressed dismay with a Supreme Court decision to declare “unconstitutional” laws prohibiting the use of recreational marijuana. In a statement, “Be ready,” signed by Archbishop Domingo Díaz Martínez of Tulancingo, health commission president — the bishops said, “We see with great sorrow and concern the possible complications that indiscriminate abuse of (marijuana) will bring: depression, increased anxiety, increased suicide rate, memory loss, social disintegration and, most seriously, the destruction of the family.” It continued, “Those of us who live with the people foresee with this decision more poverty, more family problems, more violence, more pain and more impunity.” The statement also urged parents, young people, catechists and youth pastors to “work to sow the values of the kingdom in the new generations so as not to have regrets later.” In an 8-3 ruling June 28, Mexico’s Supreme Court struck down parts of the general health law pertaining to marijuana so that individuals could grow and consume cannabis recreationally. Previously, individuals could win court injunctions so they could do so, but now the health secretariat will issue permits for such purposes. The buying and selling of marijuana remains prohibited. The court has ordered Congress to create a legal framework for cannabis — but lawmakers have asked for multiple extensions. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has expressed his discomfort with decriminalized marijuana — calling its commercialization “immoral” — and saying June 29: “If we see that instead of helping, it hurts, then we propose a change. I would send, in accordance with my powers, an initiative of law.” Drug cartel violence has consumed Mexico over the past 15 years as criminal groups battle over smuggling routes and control of territories. Some in the church express doubts that decriminalizing marijuana will diminish drug cartel violence. Bishop Salvador Rangel of Chilpancingo-Chilapa, whose diocese includes impoverished communities with long histories of growing illegal crops, says the prices for marijuana and opium poppies crashed in recent years due to the legalization of marijuana in some U.S. states and synthetic drugs such as fentanyl replacing heroin. The cartels are purchasing less of the crops, he said, causing hardship for poor farmers. “The business now for drug cartels is extorting mines that we have in Guerrero (state) and extorting budgets of municipal governments,” said Bishop Rangel, who expressed support for the church’s stance against marijuana decriminalization. Share Tweet Priority Support First Name Last name Email * Submit Basilica quickly restores Christ statue after it’s covered with red paint BY CATHOLIC NEWS HERALD JUL 7, 2021 NATIONAL/WORLD A statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus outside St. Lawrence Basilica in Asheville, N.C., is seen July 4, 2021, after vandals defaced it with gallons of oil-based red paint. (CNS photo/Patricia L. Guilfoyle, Catholic News Herald ASHEVILLE, N.C. (CNS) ─ Vandals defaced the long-revered statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus outside St. Lawrence Basilica over the July 3-4 weekend, but it was quickly restored by parish staff. Arriving for Sunday Mass around 8 a.m. July 4, staff discovered the 7-foot statue of Jesus was covered in gallons of oil-based red paint. The damage occurred sometime after the vigil Mass July 3. Bud Hansbury, the parish property manager, used graffiti remover and then repainted the statue of Jesus from the neck down, restoring its beauty before the noon Mass July 4. The statue, which has greeted westbound motorists on Interstate 240 for decades, features Jesus with his arms outstretched and the image of a heart upon his chest, representing Christ’s love for all of humanity. It stands 10 feet tall including the base. Father Roger Arnsparger, pastor, spoke to parishioners July 4 about the incident, asking them to pray for peace and respect for everyone. The parish reported the incident to the Asheville Police Department. “We are praying for those who did this, and we are endlessly grateful for the support of our community,” Father Arnsparger told the Catholic News Herald, newspaper of the Diocese of Charlotte, North Carolina. St. Lawrence Basilica, in downtown Asheville, is among the oldest Catholic churches in North Carolina. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it was completed in 1909 and features one of the largest free-standing elliptical domes in North America. In the last year, a wave of vandalism around the U.S. has resulted in defaced and toppled statues of Mary, Jesus and saints, like St. Junípero Serra, outside churches and, in one or two cases, inside churches in protest of colonialism and white supremacy. Other statues depicting Confederate leaders, Christopher Columbus, Francis Scott Key and other historical figures also have been attacked, including with red paint. Currently, Canada has experienced its own wave of church vandalism as news has emerged of unmarked graves at former residential schools on First Nations lands. About 70% of the government schools were run by Catholic religious orders. Ten churches in Calgary, Alberta, were set on fire and in some cases red paint was splattered on statues. The vandalism was discovered on Canada Day, July 1. Share Tweet Priority Support First Name Last name Email * Submit Pope makes ‘satisfactory’ recovery; histology report confirms diagnosis BY CINDY WOODEN JUL 7, 2021 VATICAN & POPE FRANCIS This is a view outside Gemelli hospital in Rome where Pope Francis had a prescheduled colon surgery July 4, 2021. Pope Francis’ recovery from colon surgery continues to go well, the Vatican said. (CNS photo/Guglielmo Mangiapane, Reuters) VATICAN CITY (CNS) ─ Pope Francis continued to have a “satisfactory” recovery from colon surgery, and by July 7 doctors had removed his intravenous drip, the Vatican press office said. After undergoing the surgery late July 4 at Rome’s Gemelli hospital, “the post-operative progress of His Holiness Pope Francis continues to be regular and satisfactory,” the July 7 statement said. “The Holy Father has continued to eat regularly, and infusion therapy has been suspended,” it added. Announcing that the pope had arrived at the Rome hospital July 4, the Vatican had said he was to undergo “a scheduled surgical intervention for a symptomatic diverticular stenosis of the colon.” The next morning, the Vatican had said the surgery lasted three hours and included “a left hemicolectomy,” the removal of the descending part of the colon, which can be recommended to treat diverticulitis, when bulging pouches in the lining of the intestine or colon become inflamed or infected. Three days after surgery, the Vatican said, “the final histological examination has confirmed a severe diverticular stenosis with signs of sclerosing diverticulitis,” a hardening of the tissue. “Pope Francis is touched by the many messages and the affection received in these days, and expresses his gratitude for the closeness and prayer,” the Vatican message said. Pope Francis is expected to remain in the hospital at least until July 11. Since the pontificate of St. John Paul II, the Gemelli hospital, part of the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, has maintained a suite of rooms on the 10th floor for use by the pope. Share Tweet Priority Support First Name Last name Email * Submit

Mexico’s bishops see complications from court’s marijuana decision – Detroit Catholic: Read Catholic News & Stories

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