Liturgy, Interrupted

Archbishop Jerome Lloyd OSJVPosted by

Sudden rumors that Pope Francis may issue possible restrictions on his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI’s Summorum Pontificum has caused an uproar among devotees of the Traditional Latin Mass (TLM). Eric Sammons highlighted here at Crisis the growth and passionate desire among some of the faithful for the traditional form of the liturgy, and he noted that the practical impact of the rumored actions is unclear.  This wouldn’t be the first time Rome interfered with a traditional form of liturgy. ADVERTISEMENT – CONTINUE READING BELOW My ancestors were among the Early Christians who first settled in present-day Iraq and later migrated to South India in AD 345. They lived among the descendants of the St. Thomas Christians, and over time the growing community worshipped according to the liturgy of the Assyrian Church of the East, presently known as the Chaldean Rite. Fast-forward 12 centuries: the Portuguese established themselves in South India and sought to challenge the Faith practices of the St. Thomas Christians, even though the latter’s history in the Faith long predated the former’s. In 1599, the Latin Rite Archbishop of Goa, Alexis de Menezes, convoked the Synod of Diamper. The six-day synod aimed to Latinize the liturgy of the St. Thomas Christians and to correct supposed errors. For instance, the synod falsely accused the St. Thomas Christians of Nestorianism. In protest, many of the Indian clergy refused to attend the synod. Because adherence to the synod was under the threat of excommunication, an estimated half of the St. Thomas Christians left the Church, publicly opposing this Latin imposition at an event known as the Coonan Cross Oath. These Indian Christians swore they would not submit to Rome, and instead they aligned themselves with the Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch.

Liturgy, Interrupted

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