Advice for avoiding the ‘rotten fruit’ of our digital age – Detroit Catholic: Read Catholic News & Stories

Archbishop Jerome Lloyd OSJVPosted by

The Eighth Commandment is taking a beating on the internet. So is the Fifth. Lying and defaming are no longer sins. They are clickbait. The crisis of fake news and media manipulation is starting to get the attention of U.S. bishops, and it couldn’t happen a minute too soon. Manufactured conspiracies like QAnon are dividing families and communities. False assertions about COVID-19 are still filling intensive care units. And it doesn’t stop there. Last year, Bishop Michael F. Burbidge of Arlington, Va., issued a pastoral letter titled “In Tongues All Can Hear: Communicating the Hope of Christ in Times of Trial.” Bishop Burbidge praised the benefits of the digital world but also warned that social media can be easily manipulated, calling attention to “fake alerts and false crises, provoking strong reactions before the truth or falsehood of an assertion can be established.” Now Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron of Detroit, vice president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, has gone a step further. In his new pastoral letter titled “The Beauty of Truth: A Pastoral Note on Communicating Truth and Love in the Digital Age,” the archbishop declared that “words matter” because the consequences of those words matter.

Advice for avoiding the ‘rotten fruit’ of our digital age – Detroit Catholic: Read Catholic News & Stories

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