Judge Blocks Indiana Law Requiring Doctors to Inform Patients About Abortion Pill Reversal| National Catholic Register

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — A federal judge in late June blocked a law in Indiana, set to take effect July 1, which would have required doctors to inform women procuring medical abortion that it is possible for the effects of the first drug in the regimen to be reversed.  In a lawsuit filed May 18 in the U.S. District Court in Indianapolis, several pro-abortion advocacy groups, including Planned Parenthood, had asked a judge to block the law, which Gov. Eric Holcomb signed into law in April.  U.S. District Judge James Patrick Hanlon issued a temporary injunction while legal challenges to the law play out. He ruled that the state had not yet proven the effectiveness of the reversal process, and that the law could violate free speech rights of abortionists.  Medical abortions, procured by way of a two-drug abortion pill regimen, have become an increasingly common method of abortion in the United States, making up 30-40 percent of all abortions.  The method accounted for 55% of all abortions performed in Indiana in 2020, according to state statistics, up from 44% in 2019. The total number of abortions in Indiana increased 1.6%, to 7,756, during 2020.

Judge Blocks Indiana Law Requiring Doctors to Inform Patients About Abortion Pill Reversal| National Catholic Register

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