On the Mechanization of the Faithful – Crisis Magazine

Archbishop Jerome Lloyd OSJVPosted by

In systems that seek to supplant Christianity, they looked to the scientific method as a source of truth, rejecting the idea that anything outside of that could be rightly called truth.

Every new age brings new ways for people to strike at the faith. We can see this with the long line of heresies that the Church has faced throughout its history. As new ideas and concepts (especially ones of the philosophical type) have been created, so, too, have new heresies been born.

These heresies can seem chic and new at the time, solving what seem like problems of the day in regard to life and the faith, tossing away the things of the past because we supposedly know better now because we’re more advanced in one way or another. While the previous sentence is an apt description of one with a modernist mindset, a heresy first defined in the early 20th century, at its basis, is another, more philosophical concept, known as scientism.   

At the basis of every system that claims to be a system of truth there must be a set of unquestionable base assumptions. In Christianity there is Divine Revelation by which we believe in things like the Trinity and the Inerrancy (properly understood) of Scripture. In those systems that sought to supplant Christianity, they looked to the scientific method—that idea by which a hypothesis is made and tested in a repeatable way—as a source of truth, rejecting the idea that anything outside of that could be rightly called truth (a wrong assumption, but not the only one).  

READ ON BELOW…

On the Mechanization of the Faithful – Crisis Magazine

Leave a Reply