France to raise state pension age – and Britain could be next

Archbishop Jerome Lloyd OSJVPosted by

The reforms have already been met with fierce opposition

France pensions protests
Protestors attend a demonstration against pension reform CREDIT: STEPHANE MAHE/REUTERS

France has laid out plans to increase its state pension age by two years by 2030 in the face of fierce opposition.

Under the new proposals, citizens will have to reach 64 in order to qualify for a full pension. From 2027, it will be necessary to have worked for 43 years in order to receive the full pension.

French president Emmanuel Macron has long pushed for an increase in the national retirement age, despite backlash from political opponents and unions. 

Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne told Reuters: “I am well aware that evaluating our retirement system raises questions and fears among the French people. We want to respond to them and convince them.” 

However the reforms have already been met with fierce opposition. Mathilde Panot, from the hard-left La France Insoumise party, described the policy as “archaic, unfair, brutal, cruel”. 

The news comes as the British government prepares to unveil a report into the state pension age early this year. The current state pension age is 66, with a scheduled rise to 67 in 2028 and then to 68 in the 2040s.

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France to raise state pension age – and Britain could be next

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